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Popular Licensed Tools

The following technologies are available for licensing through the McMaster Industry Liaison Office (MILO):

Technology Description View PDF
CARD (Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database) A bioinformatic database of resistance genes, their products and associated phenotypes. The CARD is a rigorously curated collection of characterized, peer-reviewed resistance determinants and associated antibiotics, organized by the Antibiotic Resistance Ontology (ARO) and AMR gene detection models. The CARD includes tools for analysis of molecular sequences, including BLAST and the Resistance Gene Identifier (RGI) software for prediction of resistome based on homology and SNP models. CARD Website

 

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IBDQ (Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire)  The IBDQ is the gold standard in inflammatory bowel disease research. It is a validated tool to measure health-related quality of life in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, or Crohn’s Disease. In addition to the full version of the IBDQ, there is also a short version (SIBDQ) containing 10 of the 32 questions. Click Here
PDAI (Perianal Disease Activity Index) The PDAI is a validated index that quantifies disease severity and is able to detect important changes in perianal disease. It uses a simple five-point index, which is easy to administer in a variety of settings. Click Here
GMFM (Gross Motor Function Measure) The GMFM is an assessment tool designed and evaluated to measure changes in gross motor function over time or with intervention in children with cerebral palsy. There are two versions of the GMFM. The GMFM-88 is the original 88-item measure. Items span the spectrum of gross motor activities in five dimensions: Lying and Rolling, Sitting, Crawling and Kneeling, Standing, and Walking, Running and Jumping. Click Here
CRQ (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire) original interviewer administered version (16 minutes)  The CRQ is a validated instrument used to measure health-related quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic airflow limitations. Patients report their dyspnea, fatigue, and emotional function during important daily activities. Click Here
CRQ-IAS interviewer-administered standardized version (8 minutes) Based on the original CRQ, the main distinction with the CRQ-IAS is that there is no need for eliciting activities that cause shortness of breath, because all respondents are asked to answer five questions about shortness of breath during certain activities that are the same for all respondents, but still requires an interviewer to administer the questionnaire. Click Here
CRQ-SAI self-administered CRQ including the individualized dyspnea domain (16 minutes) Based on the original CRQ, the CRQ-SAI contains individualized questions about dyspnea. The main distinction with the CRQ-SAI is that the questionnaire can be completed by the respondent in absence of an interviewer, but is otherwise unchanged in content and order of the questions. Click Here
CRQ-SAS, a self-administered CRQ including the standardized dyspnea domain (8 minutes) Based on the original CRQ, the CRQ-SAS contains standardized dyspnea questions. The main distinctions with the CRQ-SAS is that the questionnaire can be completed by the respondent in absence of an interviewer and there is no need for eliciting activities that cause shortness of breath, because all respondents are asked to answer five questions about shortness of breath during certain activities that are the same for all respondents. Click Here
CLEFT-Q (cleft questionnaire)  The CLEFT-Q is a rigorously developed patient-reported outcome (PRO) measure that can be used to collect and compare evidence-based outcomes data from patients ages 8 to 29 years with cleft lip and/or palate. The CLEFT-Q measures 3 overarching domains: Appearance, Facial function and Health-related quality of life. Each domain is composed of 1 or more independently functioning scales. Clinicians and researchers are able to administer the subset of scales relevant to their situation. Click Here
Transition-Q  The TRANSITION-Q is a psychometrically sound and clinically meaningful scale that can be used in transition programmes with adolescents starting at 12 years of age to measure and track the development of skills they need to acquire to manage their health and healthcare. The content of the scale was designed to include a range of skills that vary from those that even young adolescents should be able to do (e.g. answer a doctor’s or nurse’s questions) to skills that may require instruction or training (e.g. book a clinical appointment). Click Here
BODY-Q  The BODY-Q is a rigorously designed patient-reported outcome measure that can be used to evaluate outcomes for obesity, weight loss treatments (e.g., diet, exercise, and bariatric surgery/medicine), and body contouring to remove excess skin after massive weight loss and for cosmetic reasons. The BODY-Q measures 4 overarching domains: Appearance, Health-related quality of life, Eating-related concerns and Experience of care. Click Here
EAR-Q The EAR-Q is a rigorously designed patient-reported outcome measure that can be used to collect and compare evidence-based outcomes data from patients ages 8 to 29 years with any kind of ear condition. The EAR-Q includes 2 ear-specific scales. One scale measures how the ear(s) look from the patient perspective. The other scale measures adverse effects following ear treatment. There are also 3 single items that ask about how ear scars look and feel and how hearing aids look. The EAR-Q also includes 4 scales that measure aspects of health-related quality of life. Clinicians and researchers are able to administer the subset of scales relevant to their situation. Click Here
FACE-Q Craniofacial module FACE-Q Craniofacial Module is a rigorously developed patient-reported outcome measure that can be used to collect and compare evidence-based outcomes data from patients aged 8 to 29 years with a visible and/or functional facial difference. For patients with facial paralysis, there is no upper age limit. Craniofacial module includes 27 scales/checklists. It covers 4 domains: appearance, function, health-related quality of life, and adverse effects. Each domain is composed of multiple independently functioning scales.
SCAR-Q  The SCAR-Q is a rigorously developed patient-reported outcome measure for children and adults aged ages 8 years and older with any type of surgical, traumatic and/or burns scar. The SCAR-Q has 3 independently functioning scales that measure scar appearance, scar symptoms and psychosocial impact. One or more scales can be used depending on the outcomes of interest in any given study or clinical situation. Click Here
ACNE-Q The ACNE-Q represents the first rigorously developed acne-specific patient-reported outcome measure to provide a set of scales for patients to report how their skin, acne (facial, back, and chest) and acne scars look. These concepts are important to include in clinical trials of treatments to improve or clear acne, to prevent and improve acne scarring, or to prevent future outbreaks. The ACNE-Q conceptual framework covers 3 concepts within 2 top-level domains. These concepts are measured via 7 independently functioning scales. Clinicians and researchers are able to administer the subset of scales relevant to their situation. Click Here
BREAST-Q new scales The BREAST-Q new scales include 4 scales for breast reconstruction patients (3 breast sensation scales and 1 animation deformity scale), and 3 new scales for breast cancer patients (cancer worry, fatigue, impact on work).