Latest information and updates about COVID-19 (coronavirus) from McMaster University
Skip to McMaster Navigation Skip to Site Navigation Skip to main content
McMaster Logo McMaster logo

Healthy Cities Research Training Platform

Research Admin Offices:

  • ROADS
  • HRS

Funding Type:

Grant

Value:

CIHR and partner(s) financial contributions for this initiative are subject to availability of funds. Should CIHR or partner(s) funding levels not be available or are decreased due to unforeseen circumstances, CIHR and partner(s) reserve the right to reduce, defer or suspend financial contributions to grants received as a result of this funding opportunity.

  • The total amount available for this funding opportunity is $5,100,000. This amount may increase if additional funding partners participate. Of this amount:
    • $150,000 is available to fund up to six (6) developmental grants. Developmental grants of up to $25,000 per grant will be offered, if requested, to successful applications at the Letter of Intent (LOI) stage. Developmental grants are meant to help fund activities that contribute to the further development of a grant application (e.g. partnership building, conducting environmental scans, and consultations).
    • $4,950,000 is available for the Full Application which is enough to fund one (1) grant. This amount may increase if additional funding partners participate. The maximum amount for the grant is $825,000 per year for up to six (6) years.

Disciplines:

  • Health Sciences

Sponsors:

Deadlines:

Internal Deadline:

August 13, 2020

Sponsor Deadline:

August 27, 2020

Description:

he physical, social, and built environments in which we live, work, and play are critical to our health, development, and well-being. There is strong evidence of the links between urban environmental exposures and health and well-being, either through influencing behaviours, directly impacting biology or functioning, or through influencing gene expression as studied in the field of epi-genetics. We have a solid foundation of evidence for what factors shape and support healthy, livable and resilient cities, such as air quality, food availability, green space, sustainable housing, efficient and safe transportation systems, access to health and social services, and neighbourhood diversity. However, there is a lack of knowledge on how to create and sustain those factors in diverse urban environments to improve population health, well-being, and health equity. In the context of this initiative, the term ‘urban’ is used broadly to refer to non-rural communities. (Updated: 2019-08-28)

Canada is highly urbanized with 82% of its population living in cities of various sizes. It is imperative to ensure that Canadian researchers are able to not only design evidence-based solutions, including policies, programs, best practices and technologies, to address existing and emerging urban challenges, but for them to understand how to implement those solutions in real-world settings. Interventions, even those based on rigorous science, often fail due to a lack of understanding of how the intervention will interact with complex systems in diverse contexts. The successful uptake of interventions requires an understanding of the social, cultural and political environment, as well as the acceptability and appropriateness of an intervention for each community. To achieve this goal, community-based approaches are crucial and this is especially true when working with Indigenous (i.e. First Nations, Inuit and Métis) communities* or other communities facing conditions of marginalization. To be successful in the design, implementation and scale of interventions that foster and support healthy cities, varied expertise is needed: academic training, for example in epidemiology, public health, health services and policy, social sciences, humanities, economics, engineering, or environmental sciences; an understanding of implementation and system sciences; and experience working closely with communities and implementation partners(Updated: 2019-08-28)

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) are jointly funding a national Healthy Cities Research Training Platform (HCRTP) to develop an interdisciplinary, inter-sectoral training initiative that will generate cutting-edge knowledge and build capacity for implementation science and solutions-based research.

Implementation science is a multidisciplinary approach that studies how to promote the uptake of proven solutions in different settings. This science puts an emphasis on identifying barriers to, and enablers of, the successful implementation of solutions in different contexts and encourages innovation in developing novel approaches to maximize desired outcomes. Relevant submissions would therefore not focus solely on training researchers to determine whether a proposed intervention works (i.e. impact evaluation), but rather to study how, why and for whom an intervention is working in a specific context, how it could be improved, and what aspects of the intervention could be scaled. This ‘real-world’ applied science necessitates working across sectors and disciplines and with various co-applicants (e.g. municipalities and other decision-makers).

This Tri-Agency initiative is modelled on the former CIHR Strategic Training in Health Research (STIHR) program, the existing NSERC Collaborative Research and Training Experience (CREATE) program, and the SSHRC Partnered Research Training Initiatives.

The HCRTP is a major component of a broader CIHR Healthy Cities Research Initiative (HCRI). The successful HCRTP will be expected to leverage and complement other components of the HCRI, which is focused on growing our understanding of how to build and support healthy cities. In this context ‘healthy cities’ refers to cities that are inclusive, safe, equitable, resilient, smart, sustainable urban environments that can also adapt to changing demographics and climate conditions. Building on current Canadian research strengths and a growing body of evidence, the HCRI will launch funding opportunities over six years (2019-2025) to support world-class training and knowledge mobilization in the science of developing and implementing solution-based research in urban contexts.

In keeping with Tri-Agency sex and gender policies, all proposals are required to consider how sex and/or gender might shape the implementation, development, and outcomes of the HCRTP.

Note: For the purposes of this funding opportunity, Indigenous communities are broadly defined as individuals, groups and organizations, and populations who self-identify as Indigenous, living and working in urban centres in Canada.

Eligibility:

Eligibility to Apply

Letter of Intent (LOI) Stage

For your LOI to be eligible:

  1. The application must be submitted by a team, one being identified as the Nominated Principal Applicant, the remaining identified as Principal Applicants (as detailed below).
  2. The Nominated Principal Applicant (NPA) must be either an independent researcher or organization with a research or knowledge translation mandate.
  3. Requirements to receive LOI stage funds:
    • 3.1. The NPA must be appointed at an eligible institution (see Institutional Eligibility Requirements for eligibility process and associated timelines).
      OR
    • 3.2 Organizations identified as Nominated Principal Applicants will need to undergo a financial (iterative) assessment process and an eligibility review to meet the requirements to administer grant funds and will be required to sign a funding agreement with terms and conditions determined by CIHR. If needed, the applying organization may choose to have their funds administered by another CIHR eligible organization.
  4. Letters of intent must include three co-leads (or four co-leads if the NPA is an organization):
    • 4.1. A Nominated Principal Applicant (NPA); and
    • 4.2. Two Principal Applicants (PA) (or three Principal Applicants if the NPA is an organization). The PAs must be Independent researchers, and appointed at an eligible institution (see Institutional Eligibility Requirements for eligibility process and associated timelines).
    • 4.3. The co-leads (NPA and PAs) must include:
      • 4.3.1. A researcher from the health sciences community (defined as basic scientists, clinicians, health system/services/policy researchers, public health researchers, or knowledge users who are working to improve health). (Updated: 2019-08-28)
      • 4.3.2. A researcher from the natural or engineering sciences (defined as researchers in the natural sciences and engineering fields).
      • 4.3.3. A researcher from the social sciences or humanities (defined as researchers who empirically, analytically, or critically study society and individual human behaviour, or consider aspects of human condition and cultures).
  5. No other participants need to be identified at the LOI stage.

Full Application Stage

In addition to meeting the LOI eligibility requirements above (1-4), for a Full Application to be eligible:

  1. A minimum of three (3) Co-applicants* who will provide hands-on training opportunities related to implementing interventions must be identified. Hereafter, this type of co-applicant will be referred to as Co-applicants (implementers). Examples of Co-applicants (implementers) include, but are not limited to, implementers in the public; private for-profit; not-for-profit, and Indigenous organizations, such as municipalities, public health units; or government departments.
  2. The program must serve a national purpose and also be national in scope and the team (e.g. the NPA, PAs, Co-Applicants and Principal Knowledge Users) must represent at least three Canadian provinces or territories.
  3. The Nominated Principal Applicant (including organizations), all Principal Applicants and Co-Applicants are required to complete one of the sex- and gender-based analysis training modules available online through the CIHR Institute of Gender and Health. Please select and complete the most applicable training module (Sex, Gender and Health Research Guide). Module 2 (collection of data from human participants) and Module 3 (analysis of data from human participants) may be more relevant to most applicants. See the resource page or the Stanford University’s page on Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment for integrating sex and gender into this initiative. Knowledge Users are also encouraged to complete one of the training modules.
  4. Applications involving research with Indigenous communities must include at least one applicant who self-identifies as Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit or Métis) and/or applicants who can demonstrate their experience working in an Indigenous research environment, which may include Indigenous living experience, addressing power imbalances and cultural safety**. Applicants must submit a one (1) page “Other” attachment describing how their team meets this requirement. See How to Apply section for more details.

For additional eligibility requirements for individuals, refer to the Individual Eligibility Requirements.

Application/Nomination Process:

Step 1 – Letter of Intent:

Task: Identify Participants

  • List all participants in the “Identify Participants” task. Consult the Eligibility section and ensure that all requirements are met. All participants should also be listed in the Participant Table under the task “Attach Other Application Materials”.
    • A CIHR Academic CV is required for the Nominated Principal Applicant (independent researcher), Principal Applicants and Co-Applicants.
      • Organizations as the NPA: A CIHR Academic CV is not required for NPAs who are organizations. If an organization is identified as the NPA, a description of the organization mandate as a Personal CV (maximum two [2] pages) must be attached as an “Other” document in the Attach Other Application Materials task as described below.
    • A Biosketch CV is required for Principal Knowledge Users and Knowledge Users.
    • Applications Partners must be identified as Collaborators and must submit a Personal CV detailing their background in training which must be attached as an “Other” document in the Attach Other Application Materials task as described below.

Task: Enter Proposal Information

Task: Complete Summary of Research Proposal

  • Summarize your research proposal. Note that your summary cannot exceed one page.

Task: Enter Budget Information

  • Applicants must request a developmental grant of up to $25,000. Part of this budget must be used to cover expenses for the co-leads and up to two additional participants to attend the Strengthening Workshop to be held in February 2020 (see Conditions of Funding).

Task: Attach Other Application Materials

  • Other – upload the following documents under “Other”
    • Personal CVS: This is mandatory if the NPA is an Organization and for all Application Partners. A Personal CV (maximum two [2] pages) must be attached. Details of what should be included in the Personal CVs are outlined above in the task “Identify Participants”.
  • Participant Table:
    • In table format, list all participants (including Collaborators) with the type of participant (e.g. Nominated Principal Applicant, Principal Applicant, Knowledge User, Co-applicants, Collaborators, etc.), their affiliations, region, role (e.g. co-lead, application partner) and expertise (the list need not be final at the Letter of Intent stage).
  • Publication (optional):
    • Append a maximum of three (3) publications relevant to the proposal.

Task: Print/Upload Signature Pages

  • Required signatures:
    • Signatures must be included for all applicants (except Collaborators), and individual(s) with signing authority from the Institution Paid.
    • Original signatures are not required. The scanned signed signature pages and the Routing Slip must be uploaded in the Print/Upload Signature Pages task in ResearchNet prior to submitting your application.

Step 2 – Full Application:

Task: Identify Participants

  • List all participants in the “Identify Participants” task. Consult the Eligibility section and ensure that all requirements are met. All participants should also be listed in the Participant Table under the task “Attach Other Application Materials”.
  • Provide a CIHR Academic CV or a Biosketch CV as appropriate, with the exception of Collaborators and Applications Partners (see below for details).
    • A CIHR Academic CV is required for the Nominated Principal Applicant (independent researcher), Principal Applicants and Co-Applicants.
      • Organizations as the NPA: A CIHR Academic CV is not required for NPAs who are organizations. If an organization is identified as the NPA, a description of the organization mandate as a Personal CV (maximum two [2] pages) must be attached as an “Other” document in the Attach Other Application Materials task as described below.
    • A Biosketch CV is required for Principal Knowledge Users and Knowledge Users.
    • Application Partners must be identified as Collaborators and must submit a Personal CV detailing their background in training which must be attached as an “Other” document in the Attach Other Application Materials task as described below.

Task: Enter Proposal Information

  • The Research Proposal (up to a maximum of 20 pages, not including references). The Research Proposal should clearly outline each of the elements presented in the Full Application evaluation criteria section.

Task: Complete Summary of Research Proposal

  • Summarize your research proposal. Note that your summary cannot exceed one page.

Task: Enter Budget Information

  • Provide a detailed budget justification in relation to planned activities and clearly justify all budget items (including cash and cash equivalent contributions, if relevant).

Task: Attach Other Application Materials

  • Letters of Support:
    • Attach a letter of support from each of the co-leads’ home institutions.
  • Letters of Collaboration (optional) – upload under “Letter of Collaboration”:
    • Signed letters of Collaboration are required from all collaborator(s) listed as Collaborators on the application.
  • Other – upload the following documents under “Other”:
    • With the description “Certificate of Completion for the Sex-and gender-based analysis training modules”: Certificate of Completion for the sex- and gender-based analysis training modules for the Nominated Principal Applicant (including Organizations), all Principal Applicants and Co-Applicants;
      • After completing the appropriate training module that applies to the research project, you will receive a Certificate of Completion that you will save and upload here. The training module should take approximately 40 minutes to complete.
      • N.B. The certificate is issued as a secured document; however, you must upload a copy of the certificate (e.g. print screen) as an unsecured PDF file in order to successfully append the document. Scan documents and photocopies are acceptable.
    • Personal CVS: This is mandatory if the NPA is an Organization and for all Application Partners. A Personal CV (maximum two [2] pages) must be attached. Details of what should be included in the Personal CV are outlined above in the task “Identify Participants”.
    • Applications involving research with Indigenous communities must include at least one applicant who self-identifies as Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit or Métis) and/or applicants who can demonstrate their experience working in an Indigenous Health Research environment
      • Applicants must submit a one (1) page attachment describing how their team meets this requirement.
  • Participant Table:
    • In table format, list all participants (including Collaborators) the type of participant (e.g. Nominated Principal Applicant, Principal Applicant, Co-Applicants (Implementers), Knowledge User, Co-Applicants, Collaborators, Indigenous representative, etc.), with their affiliations, region, role (eg, co-lead, application partner) and expertise.

Task: Identify Application Partners

  • A “Partnership Details” form must be submitted for each Application Partner providing cash and/or cash equivalent contributions.
  • A signed “Partner Letter” must be submitted for each Application Partner describing their role, activities, authorities, accountabilities and contributions (including intellectual, financial (cash or cash equivalent) and other resources).

Task: Print/Upload Signature Pages

  • Required signatures:
    • Signatures must be included for all applicants (except Collaborators), and individual(s) with signing authority from the Institution Paid.
    • Original signatures are not required. The scanned signed signature pages and the Routing Slip must be uploaded in the Print/Upload Signature Pages task in ResearchNet prior to submitting your application.

Resources:

Contact:

If you are applying from the Faculty of Health Sciences, please contact an Advisor from HRS. For support with external non-industry funding, please contact Virginia Viscardi, Senior  Advisor, ROADS.